Courses

Carnegie Mellon University

  • 82215

    Arab Culture Through Film and Literature

    Fall - 2017

    Department: 
    Modern Languages
    Credits: 
    3

    Tuesdays & Thursdays 12:00 -1:30PM - Porter Hall A19A
    This course introduces students to the diversity of Arab culture in the Middle East and North Africa through a variety of critically-acclaimed films and two novels. The course topics aim to challenge stereotypes and foster a better understanding of Arab societies. Topics covered are the role of religion vis-à-vis key social and family values in everyday life, childhood and education, homo/sexuality, and gender roles. Students also learn about revolution music and art that emerged since the Arab Spring, and will have the opportunity to engage in two video-conference dialogues with students at the American University in Cairo, Egypt, and a Saudi university, and will additionally interview one or two native speakers of an Arab country to further their learning. There will be one cooking workshop on Arab cuisine! Taught in English.
    Contact Nevine Abraham with any questions: nabrah@andrew.cmu.edu

    Primary Focus on Islam?: 
    No
    Region(s): 
  • 82-300

    Spring 16 Arab Identities and Gender Roles in Conflict Zones in Film and Literature

    Spring - 2016

    Department: 
    Modern Languages
    Prerequisites: 
    None
    Credits: 
    3

    Course meets MWF 1:30-2:20

    • This course focuses on the processes of self-definition by Arab men and women in the Middle East and North Africa with relation to
    o national and religious identities,
    o social stratification,
    o sexuality/homosexuality, and
    o gender roles.

    • Students will learn about the social, economic, and political contexts of the films and literary works representing the Maghreb, Egypt, Palestine, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, the Gulf countries, and Yemen.

    • This course fosters a better understanding of Arab societies and the hybrid identities that negotiate their presence and space within.

    • Students will
    o engage in a video-conference dialogue with students in the American University in Cairo, Egypt,
    o attend an Arab film during CMU’s International Film Festival, and
    o interview native speakers of different Arab countries to further their learning of Arab culture.
    Conducted in English.

    Satisfies General Education Requirements (Critical Thinking).

    Email Professor Nevine Abraham nabrah@andrew.cmu.edu

    Primary Focus on Islam?: 
    No
    Student Population: 
    Undergraduate
    Region(s): 
  • 82-115

    Arabic for Oral Communication- Carnegie Mellon University

    Summer - 2015

    Department: 
    Modern Languages
    Prerequisites: 
    None
    Credits: 
    2

    ARABIC FOR ORAL COMMUNICATION
    (Summer 1 May 18th to june 25th - 6 UNITS equivalent to 2 CREDITS) - 3 meetings a week for 1hr 20 minutes each - tentatively MWF 11:00-12:20 or can be arranged with instructor (nabrah@andrew.cmu.edu)
    Arabic for Oral Communication is designed for students who desire to learn how to orally communicate in Arabic. This course does not teach how to read or write Arabic. It offers students the opportunity to engage in conversation that expands on the linguistic topics offered in Arabic for Global Exchange, using a spoken Arabic that would be widely understood anywhere in the Arab World. The conversation topics include greetings, explaining one's background, formal and informal meetings, eating out and ordering food, shopping and bargaining, using transportation, expressing feelings and opinion, describing things, people, and hobbies, and in addition, students will learn common expressions and their uses.

    Primary Focus on Islam?: 
    No
    Region(s): 
  • 82300

    Negotiating Arab Identities & Gender Roles in Film & Literature - Carnegie Mellon University

    Spring - 2015

    Department: 
    Modern Languages
    Prerequisites: 
    None
    Credits: 
    3

    This course focuses on the processes of self-definition by Arab men and women in literature and their representation in film. These processes include expressions of sexuality, body image, the motif of un/veiling, the issues of filiation and affiliation, and national and religious identities. Each process will be identified within a spatial and temporal context in light of the manifestations of the socio-cultural changes. The purpose of this course is to foster a better understanding of the many values on which Arab societies are constructed and how the hybrid identities negotiate their presence and space within.
    Class discussions will be enriched by:
    -attending a local Undergraduate Symposium,
    -engaging in Skype/VideoConferencing discussion(s) with Arab students on campuses in the Middle East/North Africa, and
    -having guest speakers.

    Primary Focus on Islam?: 
    No
    Region(s): 
  • 82114

    Arabic for Global Exchange (Mini) - Carnegie Mellon University -

    Spring - 2015

    Department: 
    Modern Languages
    Prerequisites: 
    None
    Credits: 
    2

    7 Class Meeting: Tuesdays 1:30-2:50 - 1/13- 1/20 - 1/27 - 2/3 - 2/10 - 2/17 - 2/24 (this is a Mini3 course)

    Course Objectives:
    - To acquire necessary cultural knowledge of the Arabic-Speaking World.
    - To learn basic, functional Arabic vocabulary that will enable you to converse in a basic, Arabic conversation. You will learn how to greet and respond to greetings, order food in a restaurant, and use important expressions and Arabic etiquette for every day conversation when traveling to an Arabic-speaking country or having a professional meeting.

    Topics covered:
    - Cultural content: Lesson 1/Diversity in the Arabic-Speaking World; Lesson 2/Historical Aspects of Islam; Lesson 3/Family and Society; Lesson 4/Political Governance; Lesson 5/America and the Arab World; Lesson 6/Mūsīqā to Your Ears and Eyes.
    - Linguistic content: Lesson 1/Greetings! Marhaba!; Lesson 2/ Eating Out and Shopping; Lesson 3/ Visit to a Home in the Arabic-Speaking World; Lesson 4/ Traveling to an Arabic-Speaking Country; Lesson 5/Professional Meetings; Lesson 6/Common Expressions in Arabic.

    Primary Focus on Islam?: 
    No
    Region(s): 

Islamic Center of Pittsburgh

  • 101

    Islam 101

    Fall - 2015

    Primary Focus on Islam?: 
    Yes
    Subject(s): 
  • Arabic Language Instruction

    Spring - 2015

    The Islamic Center of Pittsburgh is proud to continue its successful Arabic Language Instruction Program with instructor Ibrahim Khalifa. Each course will meet 3 hours every week for 10 weeks, for a total of 30 hours of class time. The tuition is $200 for adults and $175 for youth aged 14 and under.

    Orientation will be held on Sunday, January 4th, 2015 at 5:00pm at the ICP. This initial meeting will allow the instructor to evaluate the proficiency levels of all attendees. Please note: The class timings will thereafter be determined based on the varying aptitudes and needs of the students. If you are unable to attend the orientation, please contact the instructor to ensure you are placed in the appropriate proficiency level.

    Registration is required. All proficiency levels including beginners and native Arabic speakers are invited to register.

    About the instructor: Ibrahim Khalifa has a Master’s Degree in English language and literature and is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Arab-English contrastive linguistics and translation studies at the University of Pittsburgh. He has taught Arabic at the LCTL, University of Pittsburgh, and Arabic as a second language for over six years for non-native speakers in Egypt.

    Contact: office@icp-pgh.org and linguist80@gmail.com

    Primary Focus on Islam?: 
    No
    Region(s): 

Carnegie Mellon University, University of Pittsburgh

  • Muslims in a Global Context: Central Asia

    Spring - 2014

    Department: 
    Global Studies, Political Science
    Credits: 
    1

    5pm Friday March 21 - 1:00 pm Sunday, March 23, 2014

    Room 100, Porter Hall, Carnegie Mellon University

    This one credit mini-course is part of a series organized by regions around the world based on their role on the world stage, their importance within the Muslim world, and the critical influence they play in the global community. The series and course seeks to illuminate the various perspectives of the Muslim community around the world. Drawing upon the expertise and research of participating faculty from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh and our partners at institutions around the world, the mini course series seeks to have students gain understanding of the religious, culture, economics and political influences of Muslims in a global context. In addition to attendance at all lectures, students enrolled for credit are required to develop and write a research paper on one of the themes of the mini-course and answer reflection prompts during the course. One- credit/ 3 units for CMU students is provided for the completion of each mini-course.

    For more info: http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/global/mini-course/685

    Register by March 1, 2014

    PITT: http://goo.gl/vhPC7Y
    CMU: contact Catherine Ribarchak at cr2@andrew.cmu.edu

    Contact Veronica Dristas at dristas@pitt.edu for any inquiries.

    Sponsored by: University of Pittsburgh's Global Studies Center, Political Science Department and the Center for Russian and East European Studies, and Carnegie Mellon University's Office of the Provost and Division of Student Affairs

    Primary Focus on Islam?: 
    Yes
  • PS1903 (28672)

    Muslims in a Global Context: Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Myanmar

    Fall - 2013

    Department: 
    Political Science, Global Studies Center
    Credits: 
    1

    Muslims in a Global Context is a semi-annual mini-course series for students, educators, and the broader community to learn from faculty experts and practitioners about issues of critical importance to the understanding of countries with significant Muslim populations. Each term the cluster of countries changes. Speakers for this session include: Dr. Juan Cole, University of Michigan (Monday, November 11), Dr. James Hoesterey, Emory University, Dr. Sidharth Chandra, Michigan State, Dr. Azlan Tajuddin, LaRoche College.

    Graduate and undergraduate students from CMU and Pitt and other PCHE schools can earn 1 credit for the course.They must attend the complete course and submit term paper. CERIS member institutions can either participate via Internet or their students can attend with their instructor.
    Carnegie Mellon University students should contact Catherine Ribarchak at cr2@andrew.cmu.edu.
    Registration is REQUIRED for University of Pittsburgh students. Students can register for this course up till March 1, 2013

    CERIS institutions can either have their students attend the course at Pitt at no cost or your institution can offer it on your campus or to your local community via the Internet. For any inquiries please contact Veronica Dristas at dristas@pitt.edu

    The course is open to the public. Members of the community are asked to contact global@pitt.edu to reserve a seat.

    Primary Focus on Islam?: 
    Yes

University of Pittsburgh

  • Arabic, Turkish, Farsi Intensive Language Courses

    Summer - 2014

    Department: 
    Summer Language Institute
    Prerequisites: 
    http://www.slavic.pitt.edu/sli/
    Credits: 
    8

    SPEAK IT. READ IT. WRITE IT.
    Arabic, Farsi or Turkish in just 8 weeks for 8 credits at Pitt’s Summer Language Institute.

    WHAT TO EXPECT:
    • Native speakers with extensive collegiate-level teaching experience
    • Emphasis on practical pro ciency
    • Interactive instruction using state-of-the-art recording studio
    • Dorm and o -campus housing options

    SCHOLARSHIPS:
    Open to all students from throughout the country. Deadline for scholarships is March 7, 2014. Last year 90 percent of Summer Language
    Institute students received full or partial scholarships. FLAS fellowships available for
    graduate students.

    HOW TO APPLY:
    Go to www.slavic.pitt.edu/sli. Rolling applications accepted beginning in January 2014.

    Primary Focus on Islam?: 
    No
    Region(s): 

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